The Minor Injury Guideline (MIG)

Injured in a vehicle accident?  You are not alone!  Every year in Canada, about 2,000 people lose their lives in traffic-related accidents, and about 165,000 people sustain injuries on the road.[1]  Fortunately, the Statutory Accident Benefits Schedule (SABS) is here for you!  Under the SABS, you may be entitled to claim benefits for your injuries from motor vehicle accidents.  Specifically, the Minor Injury Guideline (MIG) applies to determine the benefits for the minor injury sections of the SABS.  If you or anyone you know sustained minor injuries in an automobile accident, know the MIG, know your rights.

What is the Minor Injury Guideline (MIG)?

The Minor Injury Guideline (MIG) applies to people who sustained minor injuries from automobile accidents.  Does that sound like you or anyone you know?  If so, the MIG specifies the goods and services you may be entitled to receive from your insurer.

Which minor injuries are covered under the Minor Injury Guideline (MIG)?

The MIG applies to these minor injuries:

  • Sprain
  • Strain whiplash associated disorder
  • Contusion
  • Abrasion
  • Laceration or subluxation
  • Any clinically associated sequelae, or
  • One or more of the above

 

The MIG does NOT apply if a doctor provides compelling evidence that:

1) you have a pre-existing medial condition before the accident, AND

2) this pre-existing medical condition will prevent you from reaching maximal recovery.

 

Sustained minor injury in an automobile accident?  NOW WHAT?

  1. Initial Visit: Visit your doctor AS SOON AS POSSIBLE after the accident
  2. Assessment: The doctor assesses your injury during your initial visit
  3. Doctor Monitoring: based on the injury assessment, the doctor may decide to simply monitor your health condition without further treatment. The doctor may provide you some advice and counselling on your injury, instead of treatment.
  4. Treatment: Alternatively, the doctor may determine that you need additional treatment. You will then begin your treatment phase arranged as below:
  • Phase I (Week 1 – Week 4)
  • Phase II (Week 5 – Week 8)
  • Phase III (Week 9 – Week 12)

Once you achieve maximal recovery during the treatment phase, you will be discharged from further treatment. If you require additional treatment after phase III, you will need to submit the OCF-18 form to your insurer.

If you or anyone you know got injured in a vehicle accident, you have been through enough!  Why complicate your life even more by navigating the Accidents Benefit law on your own?  Contact Shafouri Law Firm to claim all your entitled benefits!  Let our legal representation end your legal complexities.

 

Sources used

The Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), Canada’s Road Safety Strategy 2025, (CCMTA, 2016), <http://roadsafetystrategy.ca/files/RSS-2025-Report-January-2016-with%20cover.pdf> accessed 7 September, 2014.

The Minor Injury Guideline, 2014, Superintendent’s Guideline No. 01/14

[1] The Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA), Canada’s Road Safety Strategy 2025, (CCMTA, 2016), <http://roadsafetystrategy.ca/files/RSS-2025-Report-January-2016-with%20cover.pdf> accessed 7 September, 2014.

 

  • Written by our Student-at-Law, Cynthia Yan

 

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